TPNB is Safe and Secure

April 14th, 2014

Recently, a bug called the Heartbleed Bug has been discovered which could compromise a lot of data on the internet.  TPNB is posting this notice to help our customers learn:

  • What TPNB has done to protect our customers;
  • What the Heartbleed Bug is; and
  • What you can do to protect yourself.

What is the Bank doing to protect you?

At Trans Pacific National Bank, we know that security is one of our customers’ top priorities.  TPNB has worked diligently and determined that TPNB’s Online Banking and website are not affected by the Heartbleed Bug.   Your personal and financial information is safe with us.

What is the Heartbleed Bug?

The Heartbleed Bug is a serious vulnerability in the popular OpenSSL cryptographic software library.   What is that?  This is what many sites use to protect your information on the internet.  Many popular social sites, business sites, online shopping sites, and even sites run by the government might be vulnerable.

If you would like to learn more about the Heartbleed Bug, go to the website http://heartbleed.com/.

What can you do to protect yourself?

Many businesses are working to update their sites to respond to the Heartbleed Bug.  Here is what you can do to protect yourself:

  • Once sites have been updated and patched, change your passwords to any sites that require a username and password.  This includes sites such as email services, online retail stores, and online banking and credit card sites.  Changing your password is a precaution that will prevent anyone who has obtained your username and password from accessing your information online.
  • Keep up on the latest news to find out if any sites you use have been compromised or updated.

The following list includes some password best practices:

  • Use longer, complicated passwords that include letters, numbers and special characters.  The longer and more complicated your passwords are, the harder they are for a fraudster to figure out.
  • Use different passwords for each site.  This is a hard one; how do we remember all those passwords?  However, if a fraudster gets the password for one site, they will only have access to that site.  If all your passwords are the same, that fraudster could access any site using that password, especially if you use the same usernames for those sites.
  • Change your password every six months or so, especially for financial sites.
  • Keep your passwords secure and don’t share them with others.
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